Monday, February 12, 2018

Home Sales Start 2018 Nicely

Maybe it was the warm weather. Maybe it was the jobs, few as they are, being added to the metro Albuquerque economy.
Whatever the reason, metro Albuquerque sales of single family homes started the year nicely with 721 closed sales representing a 7.6% increase over January 2017. Everything being relative and seasonal, however, the January sales were 20% down from the 904 sales in December 2017.
The Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors released the January sales report today.
Pending sales, the predictor of closed sales the following month, suggest a good February. January pending sales were 1,037 homes, 28.7% above a year ago and 11%, or 104 homes, above February 2017.
Homes continue to sell faster than a year ago. Homes took an average of 58 days to sell during January. That was four days or 6.5% faster than January 2017. There were 2,671 homes offered for sale during January, a drop of 570 homes, or 17.6%, from a year ago. Inventory dropped two percent, or 65 homes, from December.
Prices changed little from January 2017. January’s average price, $217,679, was down 0.6%, or $1,237, from January 2017. However, that $217,679 was down $12,501, or five percent from December 2017. The average sales price had been over $230,000 for nine months.
The median price during January was $187,500, up 1.1% or $2,000, from January 2017 but down $6,400 or three percent from December.
Sales of attached homes (townhouses or condominiums), 77 during January, were up 30.5% from January 2017. The 118 pending sales were 53% increase from a year before.

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Lea Eddy & Metro Albuquerque Grab 72% of new 2017 Jobs

For wage job gains during 2017, it was metro Albuquerque and two rural counties. As reported last week, when the summary numbers were released, the state added 10,800 jobs. Albuquerque gained 4,400 jobs, or 41% of the state total. Eddy and Lea counties, both considered rural gained 3,400 jobs, or 31% of the total.
Farmington, Las Cruces and Santa Fe, the other three metro areas, lost 300 jobs between them for the year between December 2016 and December 2017. Government, down 700 jobs, pulled Las Cruces into the red for 2017. Local government around the Las Cruces metro dropped 600 jobs.
The Department of Workforce Solutions released metro job details yesterday.
Including making up the 300 lost metro jobs, the remaining 24 rural counties gained 3,000 jobs, or 28% of the new jobs scattered around about the home of half the state’s population.
Those 3,100 new leisure and hospitality jobs reported last week included 900 jobs added in December. A guess is that total will take a hit as ski areas continue without natural snow. So will supporting retail.
The small (20,100 jobs) financial sector led Albuquerque’s year-over-year growth with 1,600 jobs, an 8.6% hike. Leisure and hospitality followed with 1,400 jobs, or 3.4%.

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

State Gains Jobs. Mining Loses. Eddy, Lea Counties Gain

The year-end jobs report shows few signs of life in the New Mexico economy. My assessment is that our economy is weak and getting a little less weak. The claim by Gov. Susana Martinez in the January 16 State of the State address that we are strong and getting stronger is nonsense.
The state added 10,800 wage jobs in the year between December 2016 and December 2017, massive growth of 1.3%. Government lost 700 jobs over the year; the private sector added 11,500. For the month of December, the state lost 500 jobs.
The unemployment rate was six percent in December, nicely down from 6.7% a year ago. The state is now tied Washington, D.C., for the second highest rate behind Alaska. We had been third for months after D.C. and Alaska. The year-over-year unemployment rate drop was big enough to gain the designation of statistical significance from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which produces the numbers for the Department of Workforce Solutions to repackage and release. DWS released the report yesterday. The state’s job gain wasn’t big enough to be significant.
My guess is that the expansion of the national economy explains much for the state’s improvement. For example, leisure and hospitality, which is tourism to a fair extent, tied with construction to lead sector growth with 3,100 additional wage jobs. New Mexicans traveling in-state aren’t driving the growth. Instead, people from other states with jobs and higher incomes are visiting here.
Weakness shows in the 700-job year-over-year drop in mining, which mostly is oil and gas. Yet Eddy and Lea counties, center of the business, gained 3,400 jobs over the year. Even long-suffering San Juan County, home to the gas business, gained around 700 jobs.
More weakness shows in manufacturing, which continues to fade, dropping another 200 jobs for the year.
The two sectors are small, which only 44,300 jobs between them in December. But they pay well and are basic industry sectors, unlike construction which depends on businesses in other sectors to need buildings.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

December Real Estate Numbers Up

The December numbers moved in a happy direction for the single family detached home marker in metro Albuquerque. The Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors released the December sales report yesterday.
As compared to December 2016, December 2017 new listings were down, pending and closed sales were up, the time to sell a house was down and the inventory of homes for sale was down.
As compared to November, the comparisons show different results, a least part of which is the seasonal slowing of sales.
Closed sales, 904 in December, were up 19 units, or 2.1%, from a year ago. Sales were down 78 units, or 9.4%, from November. Pending sales increased 61 units, or nine percent from a year ago, but showed a 179 unit, or 19.5% drop from November.
Homes took an average 54 days to sell during December, five fewer days than during November 2016. The average sales period was up from 51 days in November and 46 days during October.
The median sales price was $193,900 during December with the average sales price at $230,180. Prices increased, respectively, 2.1% and 3.9% from December 2016. The median price dropped $5,600, or 2.8%, from November. The average was down $6,909, or 2.9%, from November.
During 2017 the sale of 11,745 single family detached homes closed in metro Albuquerque. That was a 6.5% increase from 2016. The sale of 1,165 condominiums and townhouses closed during the year, an 11.3% increase over 2016.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

ABQ Blows Smoke at Sunset Mag. Sunset Inhales

Abq is one of 20 communities in Sunset magazine’s annual “20 Best Places to Live” feature. The headline is, “an enchanting downtown revival.” The first mention is “Breaking Bad.” The second is that Microsoft was founded in Albuquerque, which happened in 1975. S0 ABQ has no other cool events in the last 43 years except “Breaking Bad.” The photo is dominated by the Kimo Theater. The hot news is that the “12-block” Central Ave core is being “reinvigorated” from its previous existence of boarded up warehouses and tagged railroad cars, attractions that exist but are off the main Central Ave downtown. Sunset touts the “city’s investment in new public transportation lines.” Just today new Mayor Tim Keller held a news conference detailing the lengthy list of big troubles with those transportation lines, which are know as the ART project. And the city still doesn’t have the money from the feds to pay for ART.
Sunset claims downtown “has become a place where locals gather all days of the week.” My understanding is that downtown is substantially empty. Am I missing something?

Thursday, January 4, 2018

No Surprise—Higher Ed Study Recommends No Change

A study led by the Higher Education Department that recommended no change in the structure of higher education in New Mexico wasn’t quite as ridiculous as it sounds. That’s because the study group was responding to a joint memorial from the 2017 legislature instructing that the department to compare New Mexico higher education with other states.
So that’s what the group did—play by the imposed rules.
Apparently nothing creative appeared.
My reaction to the headline, “Higher ed panel doesn’t endorse consolidation,” was that here we had another instance of the fox being assigned to review the condition of the chicken coop. A prominent such circumstance was a couple of years ago when the transportation department review the status of the commuter railroad, which it runs. NO, DOT’s repot said, we can’t do anything with the railroad except continue to lose millions each year.
To a certain extent, we did have a chicken coop exercise, but the group was just playing within the assigned rules. Still, when Western New Mexico President Joe Shepard co-leads the group, it can be expected that he will defend “local control.” Yet Western leads my list for structural change, as in from a four-year school into two-year school and perhaps closing Western’s programs in Deming or Truth or Consequences or turning them over to New Mexico State which will have greater administrative capability.

Monday, January 1, 2018

Tour Acoma Sky City. A Matter of Respect. Take Money.

We visited Acoma Sky City a few weeks ago. Sky City is the mesa—a rock, really—that still is home to a few Acoma People and draws hundreds for feast days, dances and other ceremonies. Sky City is located about 15 miles south of 1-40 and is reachable from exit 108 on the west and exit 102 on the east. Check www.acomaskycity.org for details such as tour times. Tours are competently run, informative and not exactly cheap at $25/person regular price. For romantics there is plenty of opportunity to partake of the Native American ethereal and spirituality. The Sky City brochure quotes a woman from Florida, “What an eye opening reverent moment.” OK.
Sky City is a 700-year time warp or maybe 900 years. The rock has no plumbing, no running water and no electricity except for propane.
A few highlights were unexpected simply because I hadn’t given them a thought. Sky City is a shopping mall. The tour is circle around the top of the rock. All along the route Acoma craftspeople have tables with their stuff, nice stuff. The vendors must be paid. We used cash. Others paid electronically using what I took to be a wireless device the size of a smartphone. The payment was inserted into one end of the device.
The tour buses climb a road that was cut 20 years (or so) ago to transport movie filming gear to the top. A newish, 4-door silver BMW was my first sight after our bus left the road. Note this, not a pickup truck, though we a saw a couple of new looking, large and brightly polished pickups, but a Beemer, baby. Cool.
A New Mexicans should take the tour. It’s a matter of respect.

Friday, December 29, 2017

Rural Counties Dominate Job Growth

In reporting last week the net increase of 9,600 wage jobs, not seasonally adjusted, between November 2016 and November 2017, I forgot to mention a salient detail—increase was down by 3,600 of 27% from the 13,200 jobs added in October, year over year. The October to October jump sparked amazement and doubt at the New Mexico Tax Research Institute conference December 19. The wizards aren’t confident the 13,200 increase is real.
The November to November increase was 1.1%. Rural counties dominated. For the period, while the 3,000-job increase in Albuquerque sounds nice, it was just 0.8%, behind the state growth rate. Las Cruces and Santa Fe lost 400 jobs between them. Farmington showed no change.
The Department of Workforce Solutions released the November issues of the Labor Market Review newsletter this morning.
Lea and Eddy counties accounted for about 2,450 of the 9,600 new jobs, roughly a quarter. The comparison has some apples and sagebrush, one number being jobs, the other being employment, but its close enough. The number is also well under the Lea/Eddy gain of 3,245 reported last week. No explanation there; maybe I can’t read.

Friday, December 22, 2017

Job Gains Continue; Government Employment Drops 3,000

The New Mexico economy keeps chugging along, producing jobs at a rate that’s more than decent for New Mexico. The Department of Workforce Solutions released summary numbers today.
The increase in wage jobs between November 2016 and November 2017 was 1.1%, not enough to be statistically significant for the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics but also not enough to complain about. The net increase of 9,600 jobs, not seasonally adjusted, was comprised of 12,600 new jobs in private sector and 3,000 fewer government jobs.
The state’s year-over-year unemployment rate change from 6.7% to 6.1% in November 2017 is statistically significant, the BLS says. Even so, it appears we still claim the nation’s second highest unemployment rate. The unemployment rate did not change between October and November.
Local government was the loss leader, down 1,500 jobs including 300 from education. The state dropped 1,400 jobs including 900 in education.
Construction produced 3,000 jobs over the year. Construction jobs reflect other things, so the increase is difficult to specify other than the Facebook job outside Los Lunas.
Leisure and hospitality, much of which is tourism, added 2,600 jobs, followed by 2,000 in professional and business services.
Financial activities produced 1,600 new jobs during the year. Educational services added 1,400. There are 1,400 new jobs in transportation, warehousing and utilities, many of which are in Santa Teresa around the port of entry.
Mining lost 600 jobs during the year. (The category is actually mining and logging, but there are few logging jobs.) The report seems curious because Eddy and Lea counties showed an employment gain of 3,245 year-over-year. (“Employment” and “wage jobs” come from different sources. The two counties host much of the state’s oil and gas production plus potash.
Employment in four-county metro Albuquerque grew by 5,330 during the year with 84% of the increase in Bernalillo County.

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Abq Home Sales Flat

November’s detached single family homes sales in metro Albuquerque were flat as compared to November 2016. Sales were down from October and homes took five days longer to sell, though the average sale was three days faster than a year before.
The Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors released the November sales report yesterday.
November saw the sale closed for 826 homes, 144 or 15% fewer than during October. The sale of 821 homes closed during November 2016.
Homes sold during November after an average of 51 days on the market.
Average and median home prices have been fairly steady the past six months. However, the November average price—$237,089—was up 8.4% or almost $20,000 from a year before. The median price—$199,650—increased $16,650, or 9.1%, from November 2016.
Pending sales, a leading indicator of sorts for sales closing the following month, were 917 during November, a 24.4% jump from November 2016. Pending sales were down 133 units, or 13%, from October. The decline can be assumed to be mostly seasonal.

Sunday, December 3, 2017

Pearce, Cervantes Shine at Stockmen's Candidate. Lujan Grisham Doesn't Come

A non-event was the big news at the governor candidate forum yesterday at the New Mexico Stockmen’s convention in Albuquerque.
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham didn’t show. I did not hear an explanation of MLG’s absence. There was just the empty chair on the podium with the four male candidates.
The Democrats are Jeff Apodaca (www.apo18.com) of Albuquerque, Peter DeBenedittis (http://peterd4gov.com) of Santa Fe, Sen. Joseph Cervantes (joe4nm.com) of Las Cruces. The Republican is Rep. Steve Pearce (http://peopleforpearce.com) of Hobbs.
One reaction was that MLG has blown off the rural areas, that her strength will be in Albuquerque and Santa Fe.
Attending the stockmen’s gathering was worth it for candidates. It offered the only opportunity to get the stockmen in one place before the November 6, 2018 general election.
The other news wasn’t exactly a surprise. Cervantes and Pearce are clearly the choice among the five candidates in terms of experience, demeanor, and ideas.
Apodaca is sincere enough. But he styles himself an outsider which is ridiculous given that his dad, Jerry Apodaca, was governor, means that Jeff grew up around politics. Poppa Jerry later ran for the U.S. Senate, but lost in the primary. Apodaca’s other problem is that what seems his main issue—he kept repeating it—is taking the state’s permanent fund money—$26 billion, he said—and spending in the state to solve all our problems. Other than that it was platitudes and banality.
DeBenedittis offered a first for me; a panel moderator shuting off a topic. DeBenedittis was attacking Pearce for taking the big money that elections cost these days including $1 million from livestock interests. The moderator interrupted with, “We don’t need to go there, sir.”
DeBenedittis, the real outsider, makes MLG look somewhat moderate by comparison. And he is arrogant about it. Maybe he will draw a few of the far left voters from MLG.
Cervantes is the third generation of a family of farmers from southern Dona Ana County. He talked of running a business—meeting a payroll—while serving in the legislature. “I have been a reformer in Santa Fe,” he said, citing instances. Protecting water is a first priority, as is expanding and growing new markets. “We need to make the public understand how important agriculture is,” he said.
Pearce grew up on a very small family farm south of Hobbs. He talked of four principles, three of which are faith, family and freedom. (I didn’t get the fourth one.)
On health care, Pearce clearly knows the policy details, a good thing since he is in Washington, D.C., dealing with those details. He mentioned value-added production such as small refineries and restarting the timber business. He said that if we got rid of fracking, a desire of DeBenedittis, the state would suffer a substantial economic because oil and gas produced through fracking technology is a large part of the state’s production.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Albuquerque Dominates Job Growth

On a year-over-year basis in October, Albuquerque continued to dominate wage job growth in the state, and those gains, as reported last week, were fairly decent for New Mexico. The Department of Workforce Solutions released detailed October job numbers yesterday.
Metro Albuquerque added 6,000 wage jobs on a seasonally unadjusted basis between October 2016 and October 2017. The 1.5% annual growth was just a hair behind the state’s 1.6%. For the month between September and October, Albuquerque added 1,900 jobs, all thanks to government, which grew by 2,000 jobs including 1,600 from state government.
For the year, Albuquerque’s growth was private sector, led 1,400 finance jobs (doing what, I wonder?), a eight percent jump from sector’s low base of 18,400 jobs. Professional and business services and education and health care both added 1,300 jobs. Construction and leisure and hospitality (tourism) each added 1,000 jobs. Leisure and hospitality lost 1,300 jobs during September due, I presume, to seasonal reductions.
For Santa Fe and Las Cruces, local government in Las Cruces, down 500 jobs for the year, was the only sector with job movement (up or down) of more than 200.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Abq Trash Official Wrong About Trash Bin Placement, Trash Bin Placement Rules Are Fantasy

Via D’Val Westphal, the Albuquerque Journal’s road and traffic columnist, we hear from Diane Winkler, marketing manager / public information for the Albuquerque Solid Waste Department, that “the city ordnance for Solid Waste does require that trash and recycle bins be placed back on a resident’s property 24 hours after service pick up. In addition, the trash and recycling bins cannot be put out on the curb more than 12 hours prior to service pick up.”
The one requirement is generous. It allows bins to be left out over night.
The requirement about taking out the bins is one of those bureaucratic unenforceable fantasies standing against reality. On my block a good many of the bins are placed in the street the night before pickup. This makes sense. People have jobs and children. Putting out the trash bin is about a ten minute chore that could blow a hole in tightly scripted morning tasks.
In any case, how would the city enforce the rule—have trash bin cops cruise neighborhoods? Burglars, not to mention murderers, rank much higher on the law enforcement list.
Ms Winkler talks about putting the trash bins on the curb. This is wrong. Look around a while on the city’s website and you will find, “Place your cart in the gutter near your driveway with the wheels against the curb by 7 am on your scheduled pick-up day. Place your container 5 ft away from all obstructions.
The website lists a hierarchy of violation actions starting with “1st violation will be documented.”
I keep my trash bins in the yard. They are nearer to the door and I don’t have to look at them, a good thing since the bins are really ugly.

Friday, November 17, 2017

NM Adds 13,200 Jobs

Statistical significance appeared in the performance of the New Mexico economy during October, all of it in a good way.
Employment grew by 13,200 jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis between October 2016 and October 2017. That’s 1.6% growth, fairly amazing all in all. The Bureau of Labor Statistics and the state’s Department of Workforce Solutions released summary job statistics earlier this afternoon. The BLS makes the judgments about significance.
Also getting the significance blessing was the year-over-year unemployment rate drop from 6.8% to 6.1%. The unemployment rate remains two points above the national 4.1% unemployment, which also is a significant difference. Our unemployment rate remains third nationally behind Alaska (7.2%) and the District of Columbia (6.6%).
The gain was 13,100 wage jobs on a not seasonally adjusted basis. That split among 13,900 new private sector jobs and loss of 800 government jobs.
The federal government added 200 jobs over the year. The state netted a 200-job loss including 300 fewer in education. Local government dropped 800 jobs including 100 in education.
The sector gainers were led by leisure and hospitality (tourism), up 4,000 jobs, professional and business services, up 3,500 jobs, and construction, presumably aided by the Facebook project outside Los Lunas and up 2,100 jobs.
Education added 1,400 jobs. Retail trade, transportation and finance each gained 1,100 jobs over the year.
Mining continued the losses, down 800 jobs over the year.

Monday, November 13, 2017

Oct. Homes Sales Up 16% From Year Ago

The sale of 970 single-family detached homes closed in metro Albuquerque during October. The performance was a 31-unit, or 3.1%, drop from September. October sales increased 134 units, or 16%, from October 2016.
The homes took an average of 46 days to sell, eight days, or 14.8%, faster than the year-ago period.
The Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors released the September sales report last Friday, November 10.
Townhouses and condominiums sold even faster. The average sales period was 43 days. October saw the sale closed on 177 homes, the second highest sales month of 2017 and 27% more than October 2016.
Home prices were higher during October than a year ago, as might be expected during a time of increasing sales. Pries have fairly stable for about six months.
The median sales price was $199,450, a 5.5%, or $10,450 increase during the year. The median sales price has been around $200,000 since May.
For the average price, it was $237,286 during October, a one-year increase of nearly $20,000, or 8.7%. Excepting a one time jump to $242,000 in May, the average has been about $236,000.